Posts in Politics
Khaleel Anderson, Up Next?

If you’re involved with any community based organization or attended a community meeting chances are you’ve meet Khaleel Anderson—a passionate twenty-three year-old recent college graduate who earned his Masters Degree in Urban Affairs, in 2019.

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Queens County District Attorney Race

On May 2, 2019, long-time Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown passed away after nearly three decades in the seat.

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Update on the JFK Redevelopment Plan

Governor Cuomo introduced the 10 billion JFK redevelopment plan in 2017. Now with a year after the announcement community members are looking for ways they can be involved. On June 17th, a community panel brought experts from the Port Authority and newly hired community outreach members into Rockaway to answer questions and alleviate concerns.

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NY State Assembly Race: Johnson Challenges Titus

Felicia Johnson has officially announced her run against long-time incumbent Michele R. Titus for the New York State Assembly. The democratic primary election for Assembly District 31 will be held on September 13, 2018. Here’s what you need to know.

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Mayor Proposes Changes on Specialized School Entry Exam

Mayor de Blasio announced plans to remove the admission exam for New York City’s specialized high schools, the highest-performing  in the public school system. Currently prospective students to specialized high schools are admitted by one test, the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT). Almost 30,000 students take this exam to earn one of the 3,000 coveted seats of these nine schools. The statistics speak for themselves, with the nine specialized high schools achieving graduation rates of 94% and higher, college enrollment above 90% and average SAT scores well above 2,000. The SHSAT determines if they require this exam for entrance, but that’s Mayor de Blasio problem with the concept of these schools.

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NYC Schools Receive $23 Million in Anti-Bias Training Funds

Mayor de Blasio and Chancellor Richard Carranza announced that the city will spend $23 million for anti-bias training of city educators. The inclusion of anti-bias training in the budget is in direct response to the cries of activists, including NYC Coalition for Educational Justice, who delivered a petition signed by 20,000 people to City Hall a few weeks ago.

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Rockaway Pipeline Project Delayed

The saga continues as the fight to shut down The Williams Companies' Northeast Supply Enhancement Project, which aims to place a 23-mile pipeline just south of the Marine Parkway Bridge that would extend to Raritan Bay, New Jersey, brings new developments. On Friday, April 20th, TWC had a critical water quality permit for their pipeline denied, however, the battle is nowhere near over. Citizens of Rockaway will have an opportunity to publicly express how they feel about the pipeline tomorrow, April 26th, in Brooklyn in Brooklyn at The Best Western Gregory Hotel (8315 4th ave.) from 5-9 pm.

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Cynthia Nixon Announces Clean Energy Plan

Governor candidate Cynthia Nixon announced her clean energy plan on Friday, April 20th at the YMCA in Arverne. Nixon took a firm stand against fossil fuels following the controversy over the Northeast Supply Enhancement Project, which would place 23 miles of new pipeline infrastructure from Rockaway to New Jersey. The candidate pledged to refuse any monetary support from the oil, gas, and coal industry and laid out her three-point plan for climate change.

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