May 28, 2022
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US posts nearly 1M COVID cases in a day, setting global record

REUTERS

THE United States reported nearly 1 million new coronavirus infections on Monday, the best every day tally of any nation in the world and nearly double the earlier US peak set a week in the past because the unfold of the extremely contagious Omicron variant confirmed no indicators of slowing.

The variety of hospitalized coronavirus illness 2019 (COVID-19) sufferers has risen nearly 50% in the final week and now exceeds 100,000, in accordance with information collected by Reuters, marking the primary time that threshold has been reached in a 12 months.

The most recent surge, which pressured waves of cancellations from industrial airways flights to Broadway reveals in latest weeks, was disrupting plans for public colleges to welcome college students again from winter trip. In Chicago, union leaders have been urging academics in the nation’s third-largest faculty district to remain house as lecture rooms have been reopening.

In Los Angeles County, the presiding choose of one of many nation’s largest court docket techniques ordered a normal two-week postponement of legal trials because of the newest wave of COVID-19 infections.

Nationally, america has seen a every day common of 486,000 new cases during the last week, a fee that has doubled in seven days and much outstrips that of every other nation.

The 978,856 new infections documented on Monday included some cases tallied on Saturday and Sunday, when many states don’t report.

The typical variety of US COVID-19 deaths has remained pretty regular all through December and into early January at about 1,300 a day, in accordance with a Reuters tally, although deaths sometimes lag behind case numbers and hospitalizations.

Omicron seems to be way more simply transmitted than earlier iterations of the virus. The brand new variant was estimated to account for 95.4% of the coronavirus cases recognized in america as of Jan. 1, the US Facilities for Illness Management and Prevention (CDC) stated on Tuesday.

The World Well being Group stated on Tuesday that proof up to now suggests Omicron is inflicting much less extreme sickness. Nonetheless, public well being officers have warned that the sheer quantity of Omicron cases threatens to overwhelm hospitals, a few of that are already struggling to deal with a wave of COVID-19 sufferers, primarily among the many unvaccinated.

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan declared a 30-day state of emergency on Tuesday and mobilized 1,000 Nationwide Guard members to pandemic response operations as COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state hit a record excessive of greater than 3,000, up greater than five-fold in the final seven weeks, Hogan stated.

“The truth is that the next four to six weeks will be the most challenging time of the entire pandemic,” Hogan instructed reporters. He stated projections present COVID hospitalizations might surpass 5,000, far greater than Maryland’s earlier peak of 1,952 final 12 months.

Delaware, Illinois, Ohio, Virginia and Washington, DC, even have reported record numbers of hospitalized COVID sufferers in latest days.

‘UNLIKE ANYTHING WE’VE SEEN’
In Kentucky, the place Tuesday’s complete of 6,915 new cases was the best every day determine for the reason that begin of the pandemic, Governor Andy Beshear urged residents to get vaccinated and put on masks.

“Omicron is causing a surge unlike anything we’ve seen and at this rate our hospitals will fill up,” he wrote on Twitter.

The unrelenting surge has prompted greater than 3,200 colleges to shut their buildings this week, in accordance with the web site Burbio, which tracks faculty disruptions. Colleges which have remained open are going through workers shortages and renewed issues about virus unfold.

In Boston, the place greater than 54,000 college students returned to class on Tuesday following the vacation break, Superintendent of Colleges Brenda Cassellius instructed reporters there have been 1,000 workers members out, together with 461 academics and 52 bus drivers.

“It does make for a difficult start to the day,” she stated.

The governing physique of the Chicago Academics Union on Tuesday urged its members to remain out of the classroom and work remotely by Jan. 18, or till town reaches minimal health-safety thresholds set final 12 months as a situation for in-person studying, whichever comes first.

The union’s Home of Delegates voted 88% in favor of the decision, sending it to the 27,000 rank-and-file academics and assist workers to ratify by digital poll on Tuesday evening.

The union has known as for extra rigorous COVID-19 security protocols, together with school-based coronavirus testing and obligatory pupil vaccinations.

District Chief Govt Officer Pedro Martinez stated the college system would comply with additional COVID-19 security measures. However he stated courses for Chicago’s 340,000 college students can be canceled on Wednesday if academics voted in opposition to reporting to work, with no distant instruction being made instantly accessible.

The union has cited information exhibiting that vaccination charges remained particularly low amongst minority college students — with simply 7% of Black kids and 13% of Latino kids aged 5-11 totally inoculated.

However faculty officers stated hospitalization charges of kids are low and that distance studying has hit minority and poor college students significantly onerous, as many depend upon school-based meals and have working dad and mom with fewer childcare choices.

Dr. Allison Arwady, Chicago’s public well being commissioner, joined district officers and Mayor Lori Lightfoot in urgent to maintain lecture rooms open. Arwady cited information exhibiting Chicago averaging simply seven pediatric COVID-19 hospitalizations a time out of 550,000 kids who reside in town.

Greater than 325,000 COVID-19 cases amongst kids have been reported in america for the week ending Dec. 30, in accordance with the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Kids’s Hospital Affiliation, a new excessive and nearly double the rely from the earlier two weeks. — Reuters

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